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OUR LANGUAGE ABOUT DEATH: INDIRECT AND CONFUSING??

OUR LANGUAGE ABOUT DEATH: INDIRECT AND CONFUSING??

"Have you noticed how few people in obituaries "died?"

If, like me, you’re a newspapers obituary reader (a sign of aging), maybe you’ve noticed the euphemisms people used to keep from mentioning the words “dead” or “died”.

Here are our favorite euphemisms for death:

1. Passed away (used 75% of the time)
2. Went to be with the Lord
3. Went home
4. Departed
5. Entered eternal rest
6. Was called home
7. Left this world
8. Succumbed
9. Lost his/her battle
10. Slipped away

While attempts to soften difficult news are well-intended, grief experts advise against using indirect terminal language, even when talking to children. Hiding the ball verbally can be more confusing than helpful.

I’m for calling it what it is—“dying” and “death.”"

(Jim's Daily Awakenings, April 3, 2019)bronze colored spiral seashell

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